BBCR IBDT Certification

BBCR Individual Breed Defining Test (IBDT)

 

The BBCR IBDT is a series of tasks that shows the overall temperament, stability and nerve of the dog.  The test will be judged according to breed and by suitable reaction denoted by the purpose of each breed as dictated by individual breed standard.  Mixed or composite breeds will be judged according to the predominate breed and level of training.

 

BBCR IBDT Certification

 

  1. The dog and handler will demonstrate the ability to walk in public and not become agitated or lose the ability to keep focus on handler when faced with a series of distractions; such as other animals, other handlers walking with their dogs and people either walking past, jogging or engaging in an activity that may be interesting to the dog.
  2. Handler will be instructed to “drop” the leash while moving with the dog, the evaluator will instruct the handler to stop and then command the dog to stop and sit while the leash is retrieved. Dog must not require more than one command, should not run off or run to other people on the field.
  3. Strangers, on the direction of the evaluator, will approach the dog/handler team and ask to pet the dog. Handler will instruct the dog to sit and stay. The dog must allow a stranger to to pet and talk to him or her without reservation or undo excitement.
  4. When inside a building, the dog will stay focused on the handler and wait for commands during the travel through a crowd of people, as well as activity and noise. Fear, apprehension or aggression will be considered a disqualification.
  5. Evaluators will ask handler to command dog to preform a series of basic obedience commands. The dog must preform each task without hesitation and need only one command from handler. Sit, down, stay, come and heal are some of the basic tasks you should expect.
  6. Dog and handler team will be asked to enter and exit a building. They should demonstrate the ability to go through a door without crowding or pulling.
  7. Dog and handler team will approach a group of people. The group will “crowd” the team and then move back to a loose gathering.  Dog may look to handler for guidance but should remain in a calm, relaxed state. The team will then move away from group, dog should walk away without suspicion or looking back to ensure the group is not following.
  8. Handler will hand the leash to a evaluator or helper and command the dog to stay and walk away at a normal pace. Handler will continue to a out of site location where he/she will remain until instructed to return. The dog may watch with interest and show mild concern for the disappearance of the handler but may not show stress or frustration or high level of worry. As the handler returns the dog may show excitement at the return of the handler but should stay under control and will not require more than one reminder by the person holding leash to sit and stay until control is handed back to handler.
  9. The reaction of a dog to sudden noises. The dog and handler team will be surprised by a loud, sharp noise from a helper that is hidden from view. Dog should show appropriate interest but remain calm, neither frightened or aggressive. The noise will be repeated one time and the team will move forward with the dog remaining focused on the handler and not concerned about the noise.
  10. Dog and handler will proceed to a marked station where they will be exposed to “gun shots” a helper will fire three shots in a one-pause-two-three sequence. The helper will be hidden throughout this test also. The dog may become alert and curious but should quickly regain composure and focus. The team will them move forward with the dog well focused on handler.
  11. The team will continue moving forward at a relaxed pace where a helper will step out and shake a rug, wave a flag or open a umbrella. The dog may again become alert and curious but should not attempt to run or retreat. Dog may stop in order to process briefly but should not need encouragement to move forward with handler. This task will be preformed at a close proximity to the team. Handler may not talk to or touch the dog to encourage it. They must continue in their path and remain focused forward.
  12. Team will walk forward and will encounter obstacles on the ground that they must cross without issue. A plastic tarp, a section of wire fencing or equivalent should be expected. The dog may show interest and appropriate concern but should not refuse or take a exaggerated amount of time to walk across surfaces and should recover rapidly to a calm and relaxed state.
  13. The team will be confronted by a helper, approaching in a bold and hostile fashion. The helper will stop several feet from the team and the dogs response should be appropriate to the breed, but no breed should show undue fear. The helper will pause for several seconds then turn and walk away. The dog should regain normal state quickly following the threat being removed.  The handler may speak to the dog but should not use physical contact to assist the dog in regaining a natural state.  The team will proceed forward.

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